Wireless & Internet Tech

Old TV Frequencies for "Super Wifi"?

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Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) suggest governments should not auction off old TV frequencies to the highest bidders-- instead they be used to create a free "super wifi" network.

KIT super wifiOld TV frequencies allow the transmission of wifi over lower frequencies , resulting in coverage as wide as several kilometres in radius. Such a network could replace pricey mobile services of the 4G variety, leading to far wider mobile internet use.

Current wifi technology operates at high frequencies of 2GHz and above.

The KIT researchers say they also have a technique for the prevention network congestion via the reserving of a 90MHz interval in the UHF bands. Another argument in favour is that in any case the general public should be given preference to the use of electronics communications.

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A Kiss for Faster Wireless Connectivity

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Keyssa claims to have a faster means for the wireless transmission of large files between devices in close proximity-- Kiss Connectivity, a low-power system using extremely high frequency (EHF) signals.

Kiss Connectivity According to the company the technology operates at transfer rates of up to 6Gbits per seconds, allowing users to download a 1GB file in as little as 2 seconds. It also has lower power consumption and, being a point-to-point connection, is more secure than network-based solutions.

In comparison, current wifi speeds top at 1.34Gbps, while NFC clocks at around 400kbps.

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Samsung Claims Faster Wifi

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Samsung announces the development of 60GHz wifi technology-- enabling wireless data transmission speeds of up to 4.6Gbps (or 575MB per second), a five-fold increase over the current 866Mbps maximum.

wifiThe company says it allows the transfer of a 1GB movie in less than 3 seconds, as well as real-time uncompressed HD video streaming from mobile devices to TVs.

According to Samsung the 802.11ad 60GHz wifi technology eliminates co-channel interference regardless the number of devices using the same network in order to maintain maximum speeds and remove the gap between theoretical and actual speeds. How so? Via the use of "micro beam-forming control technology" optimizing the communications module in less than 1/3000 seconds.

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An Ant-Sized IoT Radio

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UC Berkeley and Stanford University engineers develop a possible solution for the wireless demands of the Internet of Things-- a cheap tiny (3.7mm x 1.2mm) dual-band radio powered by the signals it receives.

tiny radioSimilar tiny radios already exist, but unlike similar solutions (which operate on low frequencies), the Berkeley/Stanford radio receives data on the 24GHz band and transmits on 60GHz. This reduces the power requirements by so much the radio charges itself with energy from received signals.

Higher frequencies also allow very fast data transmission rates, even if in the data transmitted is of low volume.

“One of the benefits of going to high frequencies is that the wavelengths get smaller and you can put the antennas on the chip itself,” UC Berkeley Wireless Research Center director Ali Niknejad tells Wired.

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Broadcom Intros "Most Powerful" 5G Wifi Chip

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Broadcom claims to double the wifi performance in upcoming smartphones and tablets with the BCM4358, a 5G 802.11ac wifi 2x2 Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) combo chip.

Broadcom mobileMIMO technology uses multiple antennas for both transmitter and receiver. It is already found in the iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina Display.

"The combination of 5G WiFi and 2x2 MIMO unlocks the full potential of today's smartphones and tablets. These technologies are becoming de facto requirements for connectivity in high-end mobile devices," the company says. "With the BCM4358 we are addressing critical multi-radio interference challenges while setting a new bar for performance that reflects Broadcom's continued commitment to be first to deliver the most powerful solutions in the market."

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